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the influenc

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Katy Perry or Jackie O: Brands with Personality Pop

By: Sophie Newman
Owner of Florida Winter Marketing

Don't be another hum-drum, same old same old, kind of brand. Take the time and effort to develop one that you love, and that your audience loves interacting with. By creating one that speaks to what you stand for and how you deliver to your customers, you're increasing the likelihood someone will decide to engage and purchase your products (instead of someone else's).

I recently had a client talk to me about her personality since we were building it into her brand. She said hers was a cross between Katy Perry and Jackie O. Deciding which one you'd rather be, or a mixture of both like her, changes how you will be communicating with your ideal audience and how they respond to you.

Why is incorporating your personality into your brand so important?
Personality makes your presence more genuine.

A brand with a personality is already more genuine than one without. The formal tone and cold, impersonal imagery of more "professional businesses" are not perceived as inviting or welcoming. By incorporating your founder's or principal's personality, potential customers can get a much better sense of what it would be like to work with you.

The notion that a brand and business should be scrubbed of its personality is also declining. Businesses are made up of people and people want to connect with other people, not a robot. Relying on the draw of their talent is one way that small or medium-size businesses can stand apart.

“Almost 50% of millennials would be more willing to make a purchase from a company if their purchase supports a cause.” - Millennial Marketing

Relevant and thriving brands are building their personality and purpose into what they do so they can continue connecting with the next generation. Companies like Tom's and Patagonia have their mission and personality at the forefront of what they do.


Builds recognition and trust with your audience.

Around 50% of people trust advertising.

That means that half of the people you're reaching already distrust your message. You're hitting a barrier before you even share what you have to say. With half of people already distrusting you, there's a lot of extra groundwork you need to cover to begin building trust.

Familiarity breeds liking. Liking breeds trust. And trust is needed for anyone to do business together.

Use your brand and your personality to build up the trust and recognition between you and your audience. By incorporating words, photos, and causes into what you are sharing, you create a deeper sense of who you are.


Differentiates you from your competitors (and the big guys).

Personality is a central way that you can separate yourself from your competitors locally, and the big guys you're competing with. No matter how small you are, you still need to show people why they should choose you over all of their other options.

A personality for your brand, when your competitors may not have one, is a huge point of differentiation. People want to feel liked and valued (they don't want to feel like a number). If your brand can accomplish that before someone even comes in the door, then you've developed a potential brand advocate.

You are also competing against the box stores and Amazons of the world. You may not be big, but you have to show how you can deliver more value than someone who has more resources than you. One way to do this is with personality in every email and contact. The level of detail you can develop within your presence can easily exceed that of large stores.

How to develop your brand personality

Your personality conveys who you are through what you're saying and how you say it. Where you speak to your audience, your positioning, and your point of view are just a few ways to add personality to what you're saying.


Your method of communication

Where you're communicating can have a huge impact on your personality since it impacts how people are engaging (or if they can engage) with what you have to say). If you're only communicating on social media, that tells a vastly different story to a customer than if you only have a website.

A great example of how your brand personality can be developed with where you communicate is, Wendy's. It posts snarky responses to comments on Twitter, which has built up its reputation for being able to take down online haters.



Don't be afraid to try on ideas for size or take a stance! People want to meet people that care about things, not another business that's too paralyzed to say exactly what they think or mean.

It can be big or small. I met a lady yesterday who's hair salon helps support autism-related charities. Just the fact that she has made her business stand for a difference already makes her unique! Some larger corporations have built their mission and purpose into their business, like Patagonia and Tom's. You don't have to make a huge change, but even donating your time or money to what you stand for can make your audience understand you mean what you say.

Your stance

Your point of view

Say what you think, it will draw people in just because they can clearly and quickly understand what you're all about. If you're against photoshopping your models, tell people why. If you're for building freedom into your business - like three-month vacations - tell people how. If you're all about going local, tell people how supporting you does that.

A lot can be said for having a point of view since it's what keeps you from being boring. Don't say something like everyone else. Don't say what everyone else is saying, just because they're saying it. Evaluate what is important to you and what matters to the people you want to work with so you create a compelling presence dipped in your own flavor of professional.


While we may never be just one thing, we still need to decide who we want to be perceived as. Katy Perry or Jackie O may seem like a hard question, but you can develop your own mashup as you create what you want your brand to think, act, and sound like.


Now that you start thinking about it: How will you make an impact with your personality?

Written By: Sophie Newman
Owner of Florida Winter Marketing

By: Sophie Newman
Owner of Florida Winter Marketing

Katy Perry or Jackie O: Brands with Personality Pop

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Don't be another hum-drum, same old same old, kind of brand. Take the time and effort to develop one that you love, and that your audience loves interacting with. By creating one that speaks to what you stand for and how you deliver to your customers, you're increasing the likelihood someone will decide to engage and purchase your products (instead of someone else's).

I recently had a client talk to me about her personality since we were building it into her brand. She said hers was a cross between Katy Perry and Jackie O. Deciding which one you'd rather be, or a mixture of both like her, changes how you will be communicating with your ideal audience and how they respond to you.

Why is incorporating your personality into your brand so important?
Personality makes your presence more genuine.
A brand with a personality is already more genuine than one without. The formal tone and cold, impersonal imagery of more "professional businesses" are not perceived as inviting or welcoming. By incorporating your founder's or principal's personality, potential customers can get a much better sense of what it would be like to work with you.

The notion that a brand and business should be scrubbed of its personality is also declining. Businesses are made up of people and people want to connect with other people, not a robot. Relying on the draw of their talent is one way that small or medium-size businesses can stand apart.

“Almost 50% of millennials would be more willing to make a purchase from a company if their purchase supports a cause.” - Millennial Marketing

Relevant and thriving brands are building their personality and purpose into what they do so they can continue connecting with the next generation. Companies like Tom's and Patagonia have their mission and personality at the forefront of what they do.

Around 50% of people trust advertising.

That means that half of the people you're reaching already distrust your message. You're hitting a barrier before you even share what you have to say. With half of people already distrusting you, there's a lot of extra groundwork you need to cover to begin building trust.

Familiarity breeds liking. Liking breeds trust. And trust is needed for anyone to do business together.

Use your brand and your personality to build up the trust and recognition between you and your audience. By incorporating words, photos, and causes into what you are sharing, you create a deeper sense of who you are.

Builds recognition and trust with your audience.

Personality is a central way that you can separate yourself from your competitors locally, and the big guys you're competing with. No matter how small you are, you still need to show people why they should choose you over all of their other options.

A personality for your brand, when your competitors may not have one, is a huge point of differentiation. People want to feel liked and valued (they don't want to feel like a number). If your brand can accomplish that before someone even comes in the door, then you've developed a potential brand advocate.

You are also competing against the box stores and Amazons of the world. You may not be big, but you have to show how you can deliver more value than someone who has more resources than you. One way to do this is with personality in every email and contact. The level of detail you can develop within your presence can easily exceed that of large stores.

Differentiates you from your competitors (and the big guys).

Introduction

Your method of communication

Where you're communicating can have a huge impact on your personality since it impacts how people are engaging (or if they can engage) with what you have to say). If you're only communicating on social media, that tells a vastly different story to a customer than if you only have a website.

A great example of how your brand personality can be developed with where you communicate is, Wendy's. It posts snarky responses to comments on Twitter, which has built up its reputation for being able to take down online haters.

How to develop your brand personality

Your personality conveys who you are through what you're saying and how you say it. Where you speak to your audience, your positioning, and your point of view are just a few ways to add personality to what you're saying.

Your stance

Don't be afraid to try on ideas for size or take a stance! People want to meet people that care about things, not another business that's too paralyzed to say exactly what they think or mean.

It can be big or small. I met a lady yesterday who's hair salon helps support autism-related charities. Just the fact that she has made her business stand for a difference already makes her unique! Some larger corporations have built their mission and purpose into their business, like Patagonia and Tom's. You don't have to make a huge change, but even donating your time or money to what you stand for can make your audience understand you mean what you say.

Your point of view

Say what you think, it will draw people in just because they can clearly and quickly understand what you're all about. If you're against photoshopping your models, tell people why. If you're for building freedom into your business - like three-month vacations - tell people how. If you're all about going local, tell people how supporting you does that.

A lot can be said for having a point of view since it's what keeps you from being boring. Don't say something like everyone else. Don't say what everyone else is saying, just because they're saying it. Evaluate what is important to you and what matters to the people you want to work with so you create a compelling presence dipped in your own flavor of professional.

Now that you start thinking about it: How will you make an impact with your personality?

While we may never be just one thing, we still need to decide who we want to be perceived as. Katy Perry or Jackie O may seem like a hard question, but you can develop your own mashup as you create what you want your brand to think, act, and sound like.

Written By: Sophie Newman
Owner of Florida Winter Marketing

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